SEAI Mapping Systems Wiki

Industrial Sector Datasets

 

Dataset Type of data Comments
Valuation Office (VO) Floor areas by building and Small Area List of Valuation Office Rateable properties with Use Type, and Small AreaProvides floor areas for most properties in Dublin, Limerick and Waterford. No floor areas available for other locations.
EU ETS Energy use and CO2 emissions for each ETS site Contains details of facility (Name, site location and industrial sector, NACE code)Energy consumption by fuel typeNo information on end use of energy.
CSO POWSCAR Location of employment Contains number of jobs per Small Area and sector
LIEN Locations of LIEN sites Site location of LIEN facilities (many of which will be covered under EU ETS).No information on energy demand per facility due to confidentiality reasons.
Energy Consumption in the UK: Industrial Sector data tables Energy demand by industrial sector, fuel type, and process type Can be used as a proxy for Irish industry.Allows a breakdown of input energy into different types of processes by industrial sector.
Reference paper: Spatial Modelling of Industrial heat loads and recovery potential in the UK.  McKenna and Norman. Energy Policy 38 (2010) Research paper examining heat recovery potential Research paper aiming to identify technical recoverable heat potential from UK industry.Suggests that min target is heat recovery from exhausts.Around 50% of exhaust heat can be recovered.Suggests exhaust fractions are around 5 – 10% of total input thermal energy in most efficient systems.  A figure of around 10% appears representative across many sectors shown.This therefore suggests that approx 5% of total input thermal energy used for combustion processes can be recovered.

Additional heat recovery may be possible from the processes, but is not quantified.

There are three subsets of this dataset as follows:

Industrial sector space heat demands

A first stage of processing required VO data cleaning, excluding not applicable entries (e.g. yards, car parks,…), and separating commercial from industrial entries. The Geodirectory is used to identify the county for each Small Area in the VO data set.

There are 4,618 VO industrial premises covering 2,142 Small Areas. An evaluation is made to assess whether in each Small Area, the floor areas for all buildings are available or not. If this is the case, the number of jobs in each Small Area (provided by an extract from the CSO POWSCAR) is identified. The average number of jobs per m2 floor area (from the VO entries) of industrial buildings in each Small Area is then calculated. This provides an overall country-wide average of jobs per m2 floor area (eliminating outliers showing averages of more than 0.5).

For each VO premise where the area is not known, an estimate is produced of the number of jobs per building (from total number of buildings in each Small Area in the VO data) in each Small Area. This is used in to estimate the missing total floor area for each VO premise (by multiplying the jobs per building in each by the total average jobs per m2 floor area).

The baseline heat demand is then calculated, excluding those premises present in the ETS dataset (see below), applying the CIBSE benchmark for workshops and a counterfactual efficiency for heat of 85%.

The 10 year forecast heat demand is calculated using a percentage growth from FED Industrial 2011[1]. This accounts for efficiency improvements and growth. Forecast data for heating is based on total energy demand, not broken down by fuel type

ETS – Heat Types

113 ETS industrial entities are included in this dataset. Power generation sites are excluded since they form part of the power generation dataset in the heat map.

Using Table 4.05:  Industrial final energy consumption by end use (different processes), 2014, part of the Energy Consumption in the UK, Industrial sector data tables, 2015 update, the ETS entries were matched via the NACE codes to the SIC codes in the table to estimate the energy use at each site by end process[2]. This allowed the application of the % of reported consumption which could be attributed to high temperature process, low temperature process, drying/separation and space heating.

The total potential heat for district heating is estimated as the total allocated energy to low temperature process, drying/separation and space heating with a counterfactual efficiency for heat of 85%.

This dataset assumes 100% of the above end uses are suitable for DH connection (this is reduced in the national CBA modelling).

ETS – Waste Heat Potential

113 ETS industrial entities are included in this dataset. Power generation sites are excluded since they form part of the power generation dataset in the heat map.

Using Table 4.05:  Industrial final energy consumption by end use (different processes), 2014, part of the Energy Consumption in the UK, Industrial sector data tables, 2015 update, the ETS entries were matched via the NACE codes to the SIC codes in the table to estimate the energy use at each site by end process. This allowed the application of the % of reported consumption which could be attributed to low temperature process, drying/separation and space heating.

For processes listed under combustion only (all of the dataset in this case), the following assumptions are used by relevant sector to determine magnitude of potential waste heat recovery:

Assumption Source
Typically half of the sensible heat in an exhaust stream might be technically recoverable Section 2.3 of McKenna and Norman 2010 article – Spatial modelling of industrial heat loads and recovery potentials in the UK
Fraction of total input energy contained in exhaust gases – Low heat fraction typically 5-10%, High heat fraction typically 10-20% Table 3 of McKenna and Norman 2010 article – Spatial modelling of industrial heat loads and recovery potentials in the UK
Gives proportion of exhaust heat that is already recovered and used in processes for each industry Page 58 Appendix for the final report for The potential for recovering and using surplus heat from industry, Element Energy,2014

Energy from which waste heat can be potentially recovered is estimated from that allocated to high temperature process, low temperature process, and space heating. A waste recovery factor is then applied to each premise according to its NACE/SIC type to obtain the accessible waste heat. The waste heat recovery factor is calculated for each premise as follows:

Exhaust heat fraction X (1- proportion of heat recovery realised) X 50% (typically half of the sensible heat in an exhaust stream might be technically recoverable)

Fraction of input energy in exhaust:

low exhaust fraction high exhaust fraction average exhaust fraction
CHP 0 0 0
Boilers and steam systems 0.05 0.1 0.075
Aluminium 0.05 0.1 0.075
Cement 0.1 0.2 0.15
Ceramics_bricks 0.05 0.1 0.075
Chemicals_ammonia 0.05 0.1 0.075
Chemicals_carbon black 0.05 0.1 0.075
Chemicals_general 0.05 0.1 0.075
Chemicals_stream cracker 0.05 0.1 0.075
Food and drink_breweries 0.05 0.1 0.075
Food and drink_distilleries 0.05 0.1 0.075
Food and drink_maltings 0.05 0.1 0.075
Food and drink_sugar beet 0.05 0.1 0.075
Food and drink_sugar cane 0.05 0.1 0.075
Glass_flat 0.1 0.2 0.15
Glass_container 0.1 0.2 0.15
Glass_other 0.1 0.2 0.15
Lime 0.1 0.15 0.125
Gypsum 0.05 0.1 0.075
Mineral/rock wool 0.1 0.2 0.15

If any building does not fit into one of the categories listed above, the default exhaust heat fraction is 9% (Fraction of total input energy contained in exhaust gases – Low heat fraction typically 5-10%, High heat fraction typically 10-20%).

Proportion of heat recovery already realised:

Heat realised heat remaining
Cement 65% 35%
Ceramics 38% 62%
Chemicals 67% 33%
Food and Drinks 44% 56%
Glass 58% 42%
Iron& Steel 50% 50%
Oil refining 63% 38%
Paper and pulp 25% 75%

If any building does not fit into one of the categories listed above for the heat realised, the average factor (51%, which gives the proportion of exhaust heat that is already recovered and used in processes for each industry) is applied as the proportion of heat recovery realised.

Industrial data set methodology

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[1] http://forecasts.seai.ie/chart.php?ref=FED11

[2] The use of UK data here is considered justifiable since Ireland specific data is not available, and the data is used to split demand by process type for each industry sector.  Whilst the fuel use may differ for Ireland, the end use is unlikely to differ from UK industry.